Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required
FeedMe Add Interests

Architectural intervention in Greenwich

Conrad Shawcross commissioned for major new art and architecture collaboration for Greenwich Peninsula Low Carbon Energy Centre

British artist Conrad Shawcross RA has been commissioned to provide a high profile architectural intervention and his largest public commission to date for the entrance to Greenwich Peninsula in the Royal Borough of Greenwich.

This commission will reimagine the 49 metre high tower which forms part of a new Low Carbon Energy Centre designed by CF Møller Architects due to be built on Greenwich Peninsula in 2015 and completed in 2016.

Shawcross’ response, which is titled Lenticular Dazzle Camouflage, unites sophisticated engineering and complex optic research to create an impressive sculptural concept on a huge scale.

The artist’s intention is to create an ambiguous and beguiling surface that disturbs and dematerializes the massing of the tower structure, producing a form that remains abstract and hard to define yet one which could potentially become a talking point for the local and wider community.

The design uses both First World War 'dazzle camouflage' - the paradox of camouflage whereby objects that are supposed to be hidden are in fact made both more visible and arresting – and ideas found in Cubist and Futurist paintings in which an object’s surface is broken up, creating false perspectives and vanishing points.

The cladding for the structure will be formed of hundreds of triangular panels, each the height of a London bus.

These tiles fold and flow across the surface of the tower forming complex geometric patterns that visually break up the flat planes to create an uneven, sculpted surface that plays with the vanishing points and perspective, and leaves the viewer unsure of where the form begins or ends.

The panels are perforated so as to exploit the phenomena of the Moiré Effect and create an object that changes in appearance when it is viewed from different locations or vantage points and at different times of the day.

As the two main surfaces of the tower sit east to west, the structure will filter the light of the sun and sky enhancing both the form and the visual effect of the Moiré. At night an integrated lighting design will produce a shifting series of ‘compositions‘ lit from within the structure.

The Low Carbon Energy Centre tower was identified as a canvas for a public art commission by project curators Futurecity to support Knight Dragon’s commitment to art and culture across their development.

Futurecity organised a competition and shortlisting process and Conrad Shawcross’s design was selected by a panel from a short list of three artists.

This commission is part of a wider cultural programme on the Peninsula. A new contemporary art gallery, the NOW Gallery opened in September 2014 with an installation by designer Simon Heijdens and a series of cross art-form events, and a new commission by Robert Orchardson follows in late January 2015; the Lazarides Editions printworks are currently housed on the Peninsula and performing arts collective Shunt launched the Peninsula’s new riverside venue with a site-specific show in August 2014.

Add Interests

Suggested Interests

  • + Environ.

My Interests

To do

Get nautical in Greenwich: The National Maritime Museum and other places to soak up our naval heritage

Get nautical in Greenwich: The National Maritime Museum and other places to soak up our naval heritage
To do

Gin junkies in Greenwich

Gin junkies in Greenwich
To do

“In an English Country Garden…” – Open Garden Squares Weekend

“In an English Country Garden…” – Open Garden Squares Weekend
Food

Danish-Japanese restaurant group Sticks'n'Sushi arriving in Greenwich

Danish-Japanese restaurant group Sticks'n'Sushi arriving in Greenwich
To do

Greenwich Comedy Festival announces new additions to line-up

Greenwich Comedy Festival announces new additions to line-up